Author Archives: OCdt Couroux

DCO’s Corner – Mother’s Day, Germany Surrenders & VE Day

Good Day 809.

This weekend was packed with special days to be observed. 

WW2 – Germany Surrenders
On May 7, 1945, Germany surrenders to the Allied armies at Reims, France. Leading to the end of WW2 in Europe

May 8, 1945 – Victory in Europe Day,
This day marks the official end of fighting in Europe in World War 2. More than 1million Canadians served, with 42,000 killed, and 10’s of thousands more wounded.  The war wasn’t over yet, however.    Fighting would rage on in the Pacific against Japan for another 3 months.

Happy Mother’s Day, 09MAY21
A special shout out to everyone’s mom. Without any of you, we wouldn’t have the squadron we have today. I hope your cadets, or adult children (officers, CI’s & volunteers) for that matter, did something special for you today.

So, some things to think about.   Hope you enjoy the rest of your weekend.

OCdt Couroux
DCO
809 Newark RCACS
“Immortal”

DCO’s Corner

Good day, 809,

Little late on this one, but bear with me.

To the best of my knowledge there are 3 big milestones this week with regards to our Military:

1/ In Flanders Fields, the poem we’ve all grown to know well as symbolizing the remembrance of our fallen soldiers, was written on May 3, 1915 by Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrea of Guelph, Ontario. He was inspired to write it after presiding over the funeral of a friend of his, and fellow soldier, Alexis Helmer during the Second Battle of Ypres during World War 1. “In Flanders Fields” was first published on December 8, 1915 in the London magazine “Punch”.
More on the history of this important poem can be found here:

In Flanders Fields

2/ Happy birthday to the RCN. The Royal Canadian Navy was born on May 4, 1910. It was founded as the Naval Service of Canada and given royal sanction on 29 August, 1911. More about the history on the Royal Canadian Navy can be found here:

Royal Canadian Navy

3/ The 76th anniversary of the Battle of the Atlantic.  In keeping with the Navy, and partnering with the RCAF,  The first Sunday in May (May 2nd this year) marks the day where we remember the participants of the Battle of the Atlantic. The battle occurred throughout World War 2 and has been observed by the RCN and RCAF for since 1945.  

Battle of the Atlantic

That’s it for now. See you all Wednesday night. And, before I forget, May the 4th be with you.

OCdt Couroux
DCO
809 Newark RCACS
“Immortal”

Aerospace Club

From WO2 Bell:

Hello, rocketeers! On Saturday May 1st at 3 PM, come down to the SQN to drop off your orange model rockets that you made during the last session. If you cannot be there at that time, let me or CI Dau know by email and we can organize a time to pick it up.

OCdt Couroux
DCO
809 Newark Sqn
“Immortal”

Apollo 11 Astronaut Michael Collins has died at age 90

Michael Collins, the NASA astronaut who was the command module pilot for the Apollo 11 mission to the moon, died today at age 90 after battling cancer.

His family shared the news Wednesday after his passing on Collins’ Facebook page.

More info here:
https://www.cnn.com/2021/04/28/us/nasa-astronaut-michael-collins-obit-scn/index.html

OCdt Couroux
DCO
809 Newark RCACS
“Immortal”

RCAF Remembers the April 29, 2020 CH-148 Cyclone Helicopter Crash

From www.canada.ca

On April 29, 2020, six members of the CAF were killed when a Royal Canadian Air Force CH-148 Cyclone helicopter crashed while operating from HMCS Fredericton as part of Standing NATO Maritime Group 2. At the time of the accident, HMCS Fredericton and Stalker 22 were operating alongside Turkish and Italian Allies, conducting maritime surveillance operations and passing information between the ships and helicopter.

The following Canadian Armed Forces members were tragically killed in the crash:

Captain Brenden MacDonald, Pilot, from New Glasgow, NS
Captain Kevin Hagen, Pilot, from Nanaimo, BC
Captain Maxime Miron-Morin, Air Combat Systems Officer, from Trois-Rivières, QC
Master Corporal Matthew Cousins, Airborne Electronic Sensor Operator, from Guelph, ON
Sub-Lieutenant Matthew Pyke, Naval Warfare Officer, from Truro, NS
Sub-Lieutenant Abbigail Cowbrough, Marine Systems Engineering Officer, from Toronto, ON
The Recent fallen Canadians page honours the members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) who have recently lost their lives in the line of duty, in the service of our country.

On Thursday, April 29 @ 1:20pm Atlantic (12:20pm Eastern), the RCAF invites everyone to join them for a video memorial to these CAF members that were lost in that accident.

https://www.facebook.com/RCAF.ARC

OCdt Couroux
DCO
809 Newark RCACS
“Immortal”

The Famous Red Baron, Germany’s top World War 1 Ace, Shot Down by Canadian Pilot, This day 1918

From Wikipedia:

(Manfred von) Richthofen received a fatal wound just after 11:00 am on 21 April 1918 while flying over Morlancourt Ridge near the Somme River, 49°56′0.60″N 2°32′43.71″E. At the time, he had been pursuing, at very low altitude, a Sopwith Camel piloted by novice Canadian pilot Lieutenant Wilfrid “Wop” May of No. 209 Squadron, Royal Air Force. May had just fired on the Red Baron’s cousin Lt. Wolfram von Richthofen. On seeing his cousin being attacked, Manfred flew to his rescue and fired on May, causing him to pull away. Richthofen pursued May across the Somme. The Baron was spotted and briefly attacked by a Camel piloted by May’s school friend and flight commander, Canadian Captain Arthur “Roy” Brown. Brown had to dive steeply at very high speed to intervene, and then had to climb steeply to avoid hitting the ground. Richthofen turned to avoid this attack, and then resumed his pursuit of May.

It was almost certainly during this final stage in his pursuit of May that a single .303 bullet[f] hit Richthofen though the chest, severely damaging his heart and lungs; it would have killed Richthofen in less than a minute. His aircraft stalled and went into a steep dive at 49°55′56″N 2°32′16″E in a field on a hill near the Bray-Corbie road, just north of the village of Vaux-sur-Somme, in a sector defended by the Australian Imperial Force (AIF). The aircraft bounced heavily, and the undercarriage collapsed and fuel tank were smashed, before the aircraft skidded to a stop.[59] Several witnesses, including Gunner George Ridgway, reached the crashed plane and found Richthofen already dead, and his face slammed into the butts of his machine guns, creating contusions on his nose and face.

No. 3 Squadron, Australian Flying Corps was the nearest Allied air unit and assumed responsibility for the Baron’s remains.

His Fokker Dr.I 425/17 was soon taken apart by souvenir hunters.

In 2009, Richthofen’s death certificate was found in the archives in Ostrów Wielkopolski, Poland. He had briefly been stationed in Ostrów before going to war, as it was part of Germany until the end of World War I. The document is a one-page, handwritten form in a 1918 registry book of deaths. It misspells Richthofen’s name as “Richthoven” and simply states that he had “died 21 April 1918, from wounds sustained in combat”.

For more information, feel free to visit this link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manfred_von_Richthofen

OCdt Couroux
DCO
“Immortal”

Happy Birthday Your Majesty

From the Royal Family’s Facebook page:

Today is The Queen’s 95th birthday.
The Queen was born at 2.40am on 21 April 1926 at 17 Bruton Street in Mayfair, London. She was the first child of The Duke and Duchess of York, who later became King George VI and Queen Elizabeth.
This year Her Majesty remains at Windsor Castle, during a period of Royal Mourning following the death of The Duke of Edinburgh.

OCdt Couroux
DCO
“Immortal”

DCO’s Corner

Welcome back everyone.
What a couple of weeks…..We had some ups: CAP, the 80th Anniversary of the Air Cadet League and the 97th birthday of the RCAF.

And we had some downs: The passing of Prince Philip, loosing one of our past CO’s – Capt Brian Howard, the 104th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge (the last one could be both an up or down, I guess)

I hope everyone that participated in the CAP had a great experience. There was definitely plenty to do and I’m looking forward to hearing all about it.

The passing Capt Howard was definitely a sad note. I’ve never met him, but I hear lots of great things from the CIC members who have. Sorry I never had the chance to meet you, sir.

There are a couple of items to bring up for this upcoming week:

1/ April 22 is the 6th birthday of the combining of the RCSU’s (Regional Cadet Support Units) and the CJCR (Cadets & Jr Canadian Rangers) under the umbrella of the Vice Chief of Defense Staff. Check it out:


2/ This week is National Volunteer Week. So let’s give a shout out to the members of the SCC and also to CV Couroux, all of whom are volunteers with the squadron. Thanks for your efforts. To the staff members, we get paid, however, we still volunteered to take these duties on, thanks for your efforts. Finally, to you, the cadets. Thanks for volunteering to join the squadron. You’re what this program is all about. We couldn’t do this without any of you. Here’s a note from Commodore Kurtz.


That’s everything for now. I’m looking forward to seeing you all during training this week.

OCdt Couroux
DCO – 809 Newark RCACS
“Immortal”

Very Important CAP update:

This message just came down from RCSU with regards to the CAP. I have received the new joining instructions, however I just learned that the links are flawed and that I should expect a revised copy shortly. As soon as I get it, I’ll email to each of the cadets in the squadron. Please read the following:

Regard,
OCdt Couroux
DCO
“Immortal”




Due to technical issues with the CCO Portal, we will NOT be using this option for the upcoming #CentralCAPCruise this week.

The cadets will no longer need an account for the CCO Portal. Instead, the CAP content will now be hosted using an alternative platform. No account creation or sign-up is required.

Your corps/squadron staff have been sent an email with details. They will be in the best position to help you access everything you need to have fun this week!

See you on deck tomorrow at 9am SHARP!